How the U.S. is turning its back on its crumbling infrastructure

The U.N. and other environmental groups say that the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord is likely to leave vulnerable countries without the ability to make crucial investments in infrastructure, such as roads and power grids.

In a report released Tuesday, the groups urged the administration to preserve its promise to fund such investments.

The U,S., developed the Paris accord but it has not made good on its commitments, said Daniel W. Cernovich, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank.

The accord is widely seen as a way for rich countries to curb climate change while protecting the poor.

“The Trump administration is clearly on the wrong side of history.

The Paris climate agreement is a dead letter.

The United States will not fulfill its commitments,” Cernix said in an interview.

He called the decision “unfair and disappointing.”

The U’s withdrawal will leave the world’s biggest polluters like the U, Britain and China the sole major emitters of carbon dioxide.

The decision could also leave the U without any funding for projects such as building water, wastewater and waste treatment plants and building new ports, airports and rail networks.

Trump has been criticized for leaving the accord without any significant environmental and economic aid for the poor, which he says is essential to the country’s development.

The White House has said the U will fund a portion of the cost of the projects.

The administration said it would be able to fund the entire cost, although it has said it will take a much larger cut of the $100 billion to $150 billion it said it had spent to date.

The Trump administration has said that while it will still contribute funds to the climate fund, it will only do so if the United States is a “high-cost economy” like the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Germany.